2006 International Center for Missing & Exploited Children Press Release Documents

Financial and Internet Industries Join with Missing Children Organizations to Combat Internet Child Pornography | ICMEC | MAR 13, 2006

WHAT: Launch of the Financial Coalition Against Child Pornography to eradicate commercial child pornography. The Coalition includes seventeen of the world’s most prominent financial institutions and Internet industry leaders along with the National Center for Missing & Exploited Children® (NCMEC) and the International Centre for Missing & Exploited Children® (ICMEC).
WHO: Senator Richard C. Shelby, Chairman of the Senate Banking, Housing and Urban Affairs Committee
Alice S. Fisher, Assistant Attorney General, Criminal Division,U.S. Department of Justice
Ernie Allen, CEO, NCMEC/ICMEC
John Libonati, Chairman, NCMEC Board
Arne Christenson, Senior Vice President, American Express®Joshua Peirez, Group Executive, MasterCard® 
Michael Smith
, Senior Vice President, Visa® 
Ana Luiza Rotta
, President, INHOPE
WHEN: 2:00 p.m., Wednesday, March 15, 2006
WHERE: Dirksen Senate Office Building, Room 628
WHY: Child pornography has become a multi-billion dollar commercial enterprise and is among the fastest growing businesses on the Internet. The Internet has enabled instant access to child pornography by thousands and possibly millions of individuals around the world. And the ability to use credit cards and other payment methods has made purchasing child pornography easy. Companies are joining the Financial Coalition Against Child Pornography to combine resources to fight this disturbing trend. Child Pornography reports to NCMEC’s CyberTipline®, a Congressionally funded reporting mechanism for cases of child sexual exploitation, have dramatically increased from 24,000 reports in 2001 to more than 340,000 today.
CONTACT: NCMEC Communications Department 703-837-6111

***Video feed provided by the National Center for Missing & Exploited Children

WHAT: SATELLITE COORDINATES

NEW INITIATIVE TO FIGHT INTERNET CHILD PORNOGRAPHY

DATE & TIMES: Wednesday, March 15, 2006, 11-11:15 am & 1- 1:15 pm & 4 – 4:15 pm EST
COORDINATES: 11 – 11:15 am EST on Intelsat A-6 Transponder 15, D/L Frequency: 4000 Vertical1 – 1:15pm EST on Intelsat A-6 Transponder 15, D/L Frequency: 4000 Vertical

4 – 4:15pm EST on Intelsat A-6, Transponder 13, D/L Frequency: 3960 Vertical

C-Band Audio 6.2/6.8

CONTACT: Paola Torres at 877-544-8400 (toll-free)

 



Financial and Internet Industries to Combat Internet Child Pornography | ICMEC | MAR 15, 2006

ALEXANDRIA, VA, March 15, 2006 – Eighteen of the world’s most prominent financial institutions and Internet industry leaders have joined with the National Center for Missing & Exploited Children (NCMEC), and its sister organization, the International Centre for Missing & Exploited Children (ICMEC) in the fight against Internet child pornography. The goal is to eradicate commercial child pornography by 2008.

The new Financial Coalition Against Child Pornography includes leading banks, credit card companies, third party payment companies and Internet services companies. Founding members of the Coalition include America Online, American Express Company, Bank of America, Chase, Citigroup, Discover Financial Services LLC, e-gold, First Data Corporation, First National Bank of Omaha, MasterCard, Microsoft, North American Bancard, PayPal, First PREMIER Bank/PREMIER Bankcard, Standard Chartered Bank, Visa, Wells Fargo, and Yahoo! Inc.

The Coalition will work in collaboration with Child Focus of Belgium, the European Federation for Missing and Sexually Exploited Children, the International Association of Internet Hotlines (INHOPE), the U.S. Office of the Comptroller of the Currency, and law firm DLA Piper Rudnick Gray Cary.

Child pornography has become a multi-billion dollar commercial enterprise and is among the fastest growing businesses on the Internet. The Internet has enabled instant access to child pornography by thousands and possibly millions of individuals around the world. And the ability to use credit cards and other payment methods has made purchasing child pornography easy.

Senator Richard C. Shelby (R-AL), Chairman of the Senate Banking, Housing and Urban Affairs Committee, was the catalyst in bringing these industry leaders together to address the problem. In challenging them to join with NCMEC and ICMEC in this effort, Senator Shelby said, “If people were purchasing heroin or cocaine and using their credit cards, we would be outraged and would do something about it. This is worse.”

The exact number of child pornography web sites is difficult to determine. In 2001, the CyberTipline operated by NCMEC had received more than 24,400 reports of child pornography. By the beginning of 2006, that number had climbed to more than 340,000.

“Not only have we seen an increase in reports of Internet child pornography, but the victims are becoming younger and the images are becoming more graphic and violent,” said Ernie Allen, President and CEO of NCMEC and ICMEC, and Chairman of the Coalition. “To eliminate the commercial viability of child pornography, we must stop the flow of money. To do that, we need the involvement of the world’s leaders in the payments industry and the Internet. The founding members of the Financial Coalition Against Child Pornography are to be commended for joining this critical fight.”

If members of the public have knowledge of a child pornography web site they are encouraged to report it immediately to the CyberTipline managed by the National Center for Missing & Exploited Children (www.cybertipline.com or 1-800-843-5678). Citizens outside the United States can call the CyberTipline or can contact any number of hotlines around the world. To learn more about these hotlines, visit the website of the International Association of Internet Hotlines (INHOPE) at www.inhope.org.

ABOUT THE NATIONAL CENTER FOR MISSING & EXPLOITED CHILDREN

NCMEC is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization that works in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Justice’s Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention. NCMEC’s congressionally mandated CyberTipline, a reporting mechanism for child sexual exploitation, has handled more than 365,600 leads. Since its establishment in 1984, NCMEC has assisted law enforcement with more than 117,100 missing child cases, resulting in the recovery of more than 99,500 children. For more information about NCMEC, call its toll-free hotline at 1-800-THE-LOST or visit www.missingkids.com.

ABOUT THE INTERNATIONAL CENTRE FOR MISSING & EXPLOITED CHILDREN

ICMEC, the sister organization of NCMEC, is a private, nonprofit 501 (c) (3) nongovernmental organization. It is the leading agency working on a global basis to combat child abduction and exploitation. For more information visit www.icmec.org.



Financial and Internet Industries to Combat Internet Child Pornography (European News Release) | ICMEC | MAR 15, 2006

ALEXANDRIA, VA – Eighteen of the world’s most prominent financial institutions and Internet industry leaders have joined with the International Centre for Missing & Exploited Children (ICMEC), and its sister organization, the National Center for Missing & Exploited Children (NCMEC) in the fight against Internet child pornography. The goal is to eradicate commercial child pornography by 2008.

The new Financial Coalition Against Child Pornography includes leading banks, credit card companies, third party payment companies and Internet services companies. Founding members of the Coalition include America Online, American Express Company, Bank of America, Chase, Citigroup, Discover Financial Services LLC, e-gold, First Data Corporation, First National Bank of Omaha, MasterCard, Microsoft, North American Bancard, PayPal, First PREMIER Bank/PREMIER Bankcard, Standard Chartered Bank, Visa, Wells Fargo Bank and Yahoo! Inc.

The Coalition will work in collaboration with Child Focus of Belgium, the European Federation for Missing and Sexually Exploited Children, the International Association of Internet Hotlines (INHOPE), the U.S. Office of the Comptroller of the Currency, and law firm DLA Piper Rudnick Gray Cary.

Child pornography has become a multi-billion dollar commercial enterprise and is among the fastest growing businesses on the Internet. The Internet has enabled instant access to child pornography by thousands and possibly millions of individuals around the world. And the ability to use credit cards and other payment methods has made purchasing child pornography easy.

“The Internet has no geographic or jurisdictional borders. Battling the proliferation of child pornography websites requires the efforts of many. Law enforcement around the world is engaged, but we must also disrupt the economics of this despicable business,” said Baron Daniel Cardon de Lichtbuer, Chairman of the International Centre for Missing & Exploited Children and former Chief Executive Officer of Bank Brussels Lambert. “The work of this Coalition will be key to accomplishing that goal.”

“Not only have we seen an increase in reports of Internet child pornography, but the victims are becoming younger and the images are becoming more graphic and violent,” said Ernie Allen, President and CEO of ICMEC and NCMEC, and Chairman of the Coalition. “To eliminate the commercial viability of child pornography, we must stop the flow of money. To do that, we need the involvement of the world’s leaders in the payments industry and the Internet. The founding members of the Financial Coalition Against Child Pornography are to be commended for joining this critical fight.”

If members of the public have knowledge of a child pornography web site, they are encouraged to report it immediately to any number of hotlines around the world. To learn more about these hotlines, visit the website of the International Association of Internet Hotlines (INHOPE) at www.inhope.org.

[Note to editor: A list of hotline phone numbers is attached to this news release.]

ABOUT THE INTERNATIONAL CENTRE FOR MISSING & EXPLOITED CHILDREN

ICMEC is a private, nonprofit 501 (c) (3) nongovernmental organization. It is the leading agency working on a global basis to combat child abduction and exploitation. For more information visit www.icmec.org.

ABOUT THE NATIONAL CENTER FOR MISSING & EXPLOITED CHILDREN

NCMEC is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization that works in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Justice’s Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention. NCMEC’s congressionally mandated CyberTipline, a reporting mechanism for child sexual exploitation, has handled more than 365,600 leads. Since its establishment in 1984, NCMEC has assisted law enforcement with more than 117,100 missing child cases, resulting in the recovery of more than 99,500 children. For more information about NCMEC, call its toll-free hotline at 1-800-THE-LOST or visit www.missingkids.com.



New Study of Child Pornography Laws Around The World Reveals Child Porn not a Crime in Most Countries | ICMEC | APR 5, 2006

WHAT: International Centre for Missing & Exploited Children (ICMEC) releases new global study of child pornography laws showing more than half of the 184 Interpol countries have no laws addressing child pornography. Just five countries have laws considered comprehensive enough to make a significant impact on the crime. They are: Australia, Belgium, France, South Africa and the United States. The study addresses the seriousness of the problem and outlines model legislation to be adopted worldwide.
WHO: Ernie Allen, President and CEO, International Centre for Missing & Exploited Children (ICMEC)
Baron Daniel Cardon de Lichtbuer, Chairman, ICMEC Board and Former CEO of Bank Brussels Lambert
Tim Cranton, Director of Internet Safety, Legal and Corporate
Affairs, Microsoft
Tan Ying Hsien, Group Head Legal & Compliance,
Standard Chartered Bank
Mary Banotti, Vice Chair, ICMEC and former member of European parliament
WHEN: 9:30- 10:30 a.m., Thursday, April 6, 2006
WHERE: National Press Club
529 14th Street, NW
Washington, DC
1st Amendment Room
WHY: The Internet has enabled instant access to child pornography by thousands and possibly millions of individuals around the world. Today, child pornography has become a multi-billion dollar commercial enterprise and is among the fastest growing businesses on the Internet. Currently the laws around the world are alarmingly insufficient to fight this epidemic.
CONTACT: NCMEC Communications Department (703)837-6111

 



New Study Reveals Child Pornography Not a Crime In Most Countries | ICMEC | APR 6, 2006

International Centre for Missing & Exploited Children Exposes Problem and Promotes Model Legislation to be Adopted Worldwide

WASHINGTON, D.C. – A new study of child pornography laws in 184 Interpol member countries around the world has produced alarming results: more than half of these countries (95) have no laws addressing child pornography and in many other countries, the existing laws are inadequate.

“Currently, the laws around the world are alarmingly insufficient to fight this epidemic,” said Baron Daniel Cardon de Lecture, Chairman of the Board of the International Centre for Missing & Exploited Children (ICMEC). “This is simply not acceptable. It is time for the leaders of every country to act. Our commitment is to work with them to bring about real change and eradicate this terrible problem.”

The International Centre in collaboration with Interpol, the world’s preeminent law enforcement organization, released the study today in Washington, DC. The study found that in 138 countries, the possession of child pornography is not a crime. In 122 countries, there is no law which specifically addresses the distribution of child pornography via computer and the Internet.

“People need to understand that each and every time an image of a child being sexually assaulted is traded, printed, or downloaded, the child depicted in the photo is re-victimized,” said Ernie Allen, ICMEC president and CEO. “The physical and psychological harm to these children is incalculable. Those who possess and distribute these images are as complicit as those who manufacture them.”

Surprisingly, just 5 of the countries reviewed have laws considered comprehensive enough to make a significant impact on the crime. They are: Australia, Belgium, France, South Africa, and the United States.

The laws of each country were examined based on five criteria:

  • Are there existing laws criminalizing child pornography?
  • Does existing law include a legal definition of child pornography?
  • Is the possession of child pornography a crime?
  • Is the distribution of child pornography via computer and the Internet a crime?
  • Are Internet Service Providers (ISPs) required to report suspected child pornography to law enforcement?

Only 22 countries reviewed were in substantial compliance with the recommended criteria set by ICMEC. They include, by region: Asia & the Pacific – Hong Kong,

New Zealand and Tonga; Europe & Eurasia – Austria, Denmark, Finland, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Italy, Netherlands, Norway, Romania, Slovak Republic, Switzerland and the United Kingdom; North America – Canada;Latin America & the Caribbean – Honduras, Panama and Peru; and Middle East & North Africa – Israel.

Allen noted, “We shared advance copies of this research with every country in order to ensure that our analysis was accurate. Our next step is to share model legislation with countries that have not yet enacted laws. We know that many world leaders do not yet recognize that child pornography has become a multi-billion dollar industry and that the world’s children are paying the price.”

The exact scope of the problem of child pornography is difficult to determine. Yet, it is clear that the problem has exploded with the advent of the Internet. A 2002 report by ECPAT International and the Bangkok Post estimated that 100,000 child pornography web sites existed in 2001. In 2003, the National Criminal Intelligence Service in the U.K. estimated that child pornography web sites had doubled worldwide. The U.S.-based National Center for Missing & Exploited Children received an increase of reports to its CyberTipline from more than 24,400 in 2001 to more than 340,000 by the beginning of 2006.

In an effort to address the insidious threat of sex crimes against children, ICMEC and Interpol are also working together to create an Internet-based International Resource Centre (IRC) on child pornography which will be launched in the Fall of 2006. The site will provide both public information and private investigative resources for law enforcement. Since 2003, the two organizations have been conducting training to build knowledge and expertise for law enforcement worldwide. Through generous funding from Microsoft, 1,322 law enforcement officials from 89 countries have been trained in seminars held around the world.

“Child exploitation is a serious and devastating worldwide problem,” said Tim Cranton, Director of Internet Safety, Legal and Corporate Affairs, Microsoft Corp. “Microsoft is honored to support the International Centre and Interpol as we work together to develop consistent global solutions to help combat child pornography.”

This global study is part of the International Centre for Missing & Exploited Children’s worldwide campaign to combat child pornography. The campaign was devised in Dublin, Ireland in October 2002 during the Global Forum on Child Pornography. From that conference emerged five main action items dubbed the “The Dublin Plan.”

In 2004, the first phase of the campaign was launched with Microsoft by enhancing the capacity of law enforcement to investigate and prosecute child pornography cases by providing training to law enforcement personnel around the world. Today’s announcement is the second phase of the campaign which is working to ensure consistency of laws between nations and to promote model legislation worldwide.



Google Joins Industry-Wide Movement to Combat Child Pornography | ICMEC | AUG 23, 2006

ALEXANDRIA, VA – The National Center for Missing & Exploited Children (NCMEC), and its sister agency, the International Centre for Missing & Exploited Children (ICMEC), have announced that Google has joined the Technology Coalition and the Financial Coalition Against Child Pornography, two critical industry initiatives to fight commercial child pornography over the Internet.

Google will be joining the Technology Coalition, teaming up with other major online companies to launch an aggressive new campaign to fight child exploitation on the Internet. The Technology Coalition will be funded within NCMEC to develop and deploy technology solutions that disrupt the ability of predators to use the Internet to exploit children or traffic in child pornography.

Members of the Technology Coalition are AOL, Yahoo!, Microsoft, EarthLink, Google, and United Online. The Technology Coalition will work to enhance knowledge sharing among industry participants, improve law enforcement tools, and research perpetrators’ technologies in order to enhance industry efforts and build solutions.

Google will also be joining the Financial Coalition Against Child Pornography, a group of leading banks, credit card companies, third party payment companies, and Internet services companies working to stop the flow of funds to child pornography web sites. The Financial Coalition was formed in 2005 at the urging of Senator Richard C. Shelby, Chairman of the Senate Banking, Housing and Urban Affairs Committee.

Members of the Financial Coalition Against Child Pornography are: America Online, American Express Company, Authorize.Net, Bank of America, Chase, Citigroup, Discover Financial Services LLC, e-gold, First Data Corporation, First National Bank of Omaha, Google, MasterCard, Microsoft, North American Bancard, Nova Information Systems, PayPal, First PREMIER Bank/PREMIER Bankcard, Standard Chartered Bank, Visa, Wells Fargo, and Yahoo! Inc.

“Both Coalitions exemplify the best spirit of private industry, as these companies set aside their competitive zeal to work together to protect the world’s most vulnerable citizens,” said Ernie Allen, President and Chief Executive Officer of NCMEC and ICMEC. “Google is to be commended for bringing its considerable expertise to the fight.”

“Google has joined these efforts as part of its zero-tolerance policy on child pornography and those who would promote it,” said Nicole Wong, Associate General Counsel, Products and Intellectual Property, of Google Inc. “Participation in these coalitions will be critical to our efforts to protect children on the Internet, which include actively supporting law enforcement efforts to track down predators, finding new technological solutions, and participating in industry-wide initiatives.”

In 2001, the CyberTipline operated by NCMEC had received more than 24,400 reports of child pornography. By the beginning of 2006, that number had climbed to more than 340,000.

If members of the public have knowledge of a child pornography web site, they are encouraged to report it immediately to the CyberTipline managed by the National Center for Missing & Exploited Children (www.cybertipline.com or 1-800-843-5678). Citizens outside the United States can call the CyberTipline or can contact any number of hotlines around the world. To learn more about these hotlines, visit the web site of the International Association of Internet Hotlines (INHOPE) at www.inhope.org.

ABOUT GOOGLE INC.

Google’s innovative search technologies connect millions of people around the world with information every day. Founded in 1998 by Stanford Ph.D. students Larry Page and Sergey Brin, Google today is a top web property in all major global markets. Google’s targeted advertising program provides businesses of all sizes with measurable results, while enhancing the overall web experience for users. Google is headquartered in Silicon Valley with offices throughout the Americas, Europe and Asia. For more information, visit www.google.com.

ABOUT THE NATIONAL CENTER FOR MISSING AND EXPLOITED CHILDREN

The National Center for Missing & Exploited Children is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization, that works in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Justice’s Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention. NCMEC’s congressionally mandated CyberTipline, a reporting mechanism for child sexual exploitation, has handled more than 401,200 leads. Since its establishment in 1984, NCMEC has assisted law enforcement with more than 122,600 missing child cases, resulting in the recovery of more than 104,900 children. For more information about NCMEC, call its toll-free, 24-hour hotline at 1-800-THE-LOST or visit its web site at www.missingkids.com.

ABOUT THE INTERNATIONAL CENTRE FOR MISSING & EXPLOITED CHILDREN

The International Centre for Missing & Exploited Children is a private, nonprofit 501(c) (3) nongovernmental organization. It is the leading agency working on a global basis to combat child abduction and exploitation. It is the sister organization of the National Center for Missing& Exploited Children. For more information visit www.icmec.org.



Capital One Joins the Financial Coalition Against Child Pornography | ICMEC | SEP 7, 2006

The Company Will Work With Other Leaders in the Financial and Internet Industries to Combat Internet Child Pornography

ALEXANDRIA, VA – The National Center for Missing & Exploited Children (NCMEC), and its sister organization the International Centre for Missing & Exploited Children (ICMEC), have announced that Capital One Financial Corporation has joined the Financial Coalition Against Child Pornography.

The Coalition, which includes leading banks, credit card companies, third party payment companies and Internet services companies, is dedicated to fighting child pornography over the Internet. The goal of the Financial Coalition Against Child Pornography is to eradicate commercial child pornography by 2008.

Child pornography has become a multi-billion dollar commercial enterprise and is among the fastest growing businesses on the Internet. The Internet has enabled instant access to child pornography by thousands and possibly millions of individuals around the world. The ability to use credit cards and other payment methods to purchase child pornography has made it easier than ever to obtain.

“The mission of the Financial Coalition Against Child Pornography is to eliminate the commercial viability of child pornography by stopping the flow of money,” said Ernie Allen, president and CEO of NCMEC and ICMEC, and chairman of the Coalition. “As an integral participant in the financial services industry, Capital One will help us accomplish that goal.”

The exact number of child pornography web sites is difficult to determine. In 2001, the CyberTipline, a reporting mechanism for child sexual exploitation operated by NCMEC, received more than 24,400 reports of child pornography. By August 2006, the number of reports had climbed to more than 375,000.

Other members of the Coalition include:

America Online
American Express Company Authorize.Net
Bank of America
Chase
Citigroup
Discover Financial Services LLC
e-gold
First Data Corporation
First National Bank of Omaha Google
MasterCard
Microsoft
North American Bancard
Nova Information Systems
PayPal
First PREMIER Bank/PREMIER Bankcard
Standard Chartered Bank
Visa
Wells Fargo
Yahoo! Inc.

If members of the public have knowledge of a child pornography web site, they are encouraged to visit the CyberTipline at www.cybertipline.com or to call 1-800-THE-LOST (1-800-843-5678) immediately. Those outside the United States can also call the CyberTipline or contact any number of hotlines around the world. To learn more about these hotlines, visit the International Association of Internet Hotlines (INHOPE) at www.inhope.org.

ABOUT CAPITAL ONE FINANCIAL CORPORATION

Headquartered in McLean, Virginia, Capital One Financial Corporation (http://www.capitalone.com) is a financial holding company, with more than 324 locations in Texas and Louisiana. Its principal subsidiaries, Capital One Bank, Capital One, F.S.B., Capital One Auto Finance, Inc., and Capital One, N.A., offer a broad spectrum of financial products and services to consumers, small businesses and commercial clients. Capital One’s subsidiaries collectively had $47.2 billion in deposits and $108.4 billion in managed loans outstanding as of June 30, 2006. Capital One, a Fortune 500 company, trades on the New York Stock Exchange under the symbol “COF” and is included in the S&P 500 index.

ABOUT THE NATIONAL CENTER FOR MISSING & EXPLOITED CHILDREN

The National Center for Missing & Exploited Children is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization that works in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Justice’s Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention. NCMEC’s congressionally mandated CyberTipline, a reporting mechanism for child sexual exploitation, has handled more than 401,200 leads. Since its establishment in 1984, NCMEC has assisted law enforcement with more than 122,600 missing child cases, resulting in the recovery of more than 104,900 children. For more information about NCMEC, call its toll-free, 24-hour hotline at 1-800-THE-LOST or visit its web site at www.missingkids.com.

ABOUT THE INTERNATIONAL CENTRE FOR MISSING & EXPLOITED CHILDREN

The International Centre for Missing & Exploited Children is a private, nonprofit 501(c) (3) nongovernmental organization. It is the leading agency working on a global basis to combat child abduction and exploitation. It is the sister organization of the National Center for Missing & Exploited Children. For more information visit www.icmec.org.



Microsoft Executive Joins Board of the International Centre for Missing & Exploited Children | ICMEC | OCT 16, 2006

ALEXANDRIA, VA – The International Centre for Missing & Exploited Children (ICMEC), sister organization to the National Center for Missing & Exploited Children ® (NCMEC) announced today that Timothy W. Cranton, Senior Director of Worldwide Internet Safety Programs at Microsoft Corporation, has been named to its Board of Directors.

Cranton leads efforts at Microsoft to develop comprehensive enforcement and government partnership programs that address Internet security and safety threats. He works with a worldwide team of lawyers, investigators, technical analysts and other specialists to support law enforcement and government in civil and criminal enforcement, relating to Internet crimes and has been committed to developing a world-wide strategy for the protection of children on the Internet.

“Microsoft shares our wish for the Internet to be a safer place for children and has proven to be a crucial ally in our efforts to meet that goal,” said Ernie Allen, President and CEO of NCMEC and ICMEC. “Tim’s addition to our Board only strengthens that collaboration and we welcome his knowledge and expertise.”

Since 2003, ICMEC, NCMEC, and Microsoft have been working together across multiple initiatives that focus on Internet safety worldwide, including:

  • International Law Enforcement Training Initiative – Microsoft partners with ICMEC and Interpol to provide a worldwide series of training programs for law-enforcement personnel who investigate computer-facilitated crimes against children as part of ICMEC’s Global Campaign Against Child Pornography. To date, 18 trainings have been conducted with more than 1,700 law enforcement officers representing 93 countries.
  • “Child Pornography: Model Legislation & Global Review” – Microsoft supported the release of this ICMEC report on child-pornography legislation around the world with country research and as a partner in the implementation phase. The full report is available online at www.icmec.org.
  • Technology Coalition – Microsoft was a founding member of NCMEC’s Technology Coalition, an effort among online industry leaders to develop and deploy technology solutions that disrupt the ability of predators to use the Internet to exploit children or traffic in child pornography.
  • Financial Coalition Against Child Pornography – Microsoft joined financial institutions, other Internet industry leaders, NCMEC, and ICMEC in this coalition launched in March 2006 to eradicate commercial child pornography.

Prior to joining Microsoft, Cranton worked in Seattle as a senior attorney at the Bogle & Gates law firm, where he focused on general litigation and white-collar criminal defense. Previously, he worked as an attorney at O’Shea, Barnard & Martin and as a deputy prosecuting attorney for the King County Prosecuting Attorney’s Office in Seattle.

Cranton graduated magna cum laude with a Bachelor of Arts degree in public policy from Duke University. He obtained his law degree from Yale University, where he participated in the AIDS Litigation Project and served as articles editor for the Yale Law & Policy Review.

Cranton will join the Board of Directors at their next meeting in Brussels, Belgium later this month. 



The Financial Coalition Against Child Pornography Adds Four Financial Services Leaders to its Roster | ICMEC | NOV 1, 2006

Chase Paymentech Solutions, Global Payments Inc., HSBC – North America and Washington Mutual Will Work With Their Peers in the Financial and Internet Industries to Combat Internet Child Pornography

ALEXANDRIA, VA – The National Center for Missing & Exploited Children (NCMEC), and its sister organization the International Centre for Missing & Exploited Children (ICMEC), have announced that Chase Paymentech Solutions, Global Payments Inc., HSBC – North America and Washington Mutual have joined the Financial Coalition Against Child Pornography.

The Coalition, which includes leading banks, credit card companies, third party payment companies and Internet services companies, is dedicated to fighting child pornography over the Internet. The goal of the Financial Coalition Against Child Pornography is to eradicate commercial child pornography by 2008.

Child pornography has become a multi-billion dollar commercial enterprise and is among the fastest growing businesses on the Internet. The Internet has enabled instant access to child pornography by thousands and possibly millions of individuals around the world. The ability to use credit cards and other payment methods to purchase child pornography has made it easier than ever to obtain.

“The commitments from these financial services leaders demonstrate the momentum of the Financial Coalition Against Child Pornography,” said Ernie Allen, president and CEO of NCMEC and ICMEC, and chairman of the Coalition. “Their collective expertise will go a long way toward helping us follow the flow of funds and disrupt this insidious business.”

Other members of the Coalition include: America Online, American Express Company, Authorize.Net, Bank of America, Capital One, Chase, Citigroup, Discover Financial Services LLC, e-gold, First Data Corporation, First National Bank of Omaha, Google, MasterCard, Microsoft, North American Bancard, Nova Information Systems, PayPal, First PREMIER Bank/PREMIER Bankcard, Standard Chartered Bank, Visa, Wells Fargo, and Yahoo! Inc.

Members of the Coalition represent 88% of the U.S. payments industry, measured by volume (dollars running through the system). The exact number of child pornography web sites is difficult to determine. In 2001, the CyberTipline, a reporting mechanism for child sexual exploitation operated by NCMEC, received more than 24,400 reports of child pornography. By August 2006, the number of reports had climbed to more than 375,000.

If members of the public have knowledge of a child pornography web site, they are encouraged to visit the CyberTipline at www.cybertipline.com or to call 1-800-THE-LOST (1-800-843-5678) immediately. Those outside the United States can also call the CyberTipline or contact any number of hotlines around the world. To learn more about these hotlines, visit the International Association of Internet Hotlines (INHOPE) at www.inhope.org.