John Deutch

John M. Deutch | WIKIPEDIA | MAY 23, 2017

John Mark Deutch (born July 27, 1938) is an American physical chemist and civil servant. He was the United States Deputy Secretary of Defense from 1994 to 1995 and Director of Central Intelligence (DCI) from May 10, 1995 until December 15, 1996.[2] He is an Institute Professor at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and serves on the Board of Directors of Citigroup, Cummins, Raytheon, and Schlumberger Ltd. Deutch is also a member of the Trilateral Commission.[3]

Background

Deutch was born in Brussels, Belgium, the son of Rachel Felicia (Fischer) and Michael Joseph Deutch.[4] He is of Russian Jewish heritage, and became a United States citizen in 1945.[2] He graduated from the Sidwell Friends School in Washington, D.C. and earned a bachelor’s degree in History and Economics from Amherst College. In 1961, he earned a Bachelor of Science degree in Chemical Engineering and, in 1966, he earned a PhD in Chemistry, both from Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He holds honorary degrees from Amherst College, University of Massachusetts Lowell, and Northeastern University.

From 1977 to 1980, he served in several positions for the United States Department of Energy (DOE): as Director of Energy Research, Acting Assistant Secretary for Energy Technology, and Undersecretary of the Department. In 1978, Deutch published two physical-chemistry papers (in, Combustion and Flame, 1978, vol 231 pp.215–221 and 223-229) on modeling the mechanism of the Fuel/Air mixture. He served as the provost of MIT from 1985 – 1990. As MIT Dean of Science and Provost, Deutch oversaw the disbanding of the Department of Applied Biological Sciences, including its toxicology faculty.

CIA Director tenure

n 1995, President Bill Clinton appointed him Director of Central Intelligence. As Deutch was initially reluctant to accept the appointment, the position was conferred with Cabinet rank, a perquisite ultimately retained by successor George Tenet through the end of the Clinton administration. As head of the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA), Deutch continued the policy of his predecessor R. James Woolsey to declassify records pertaining to U.S. covert operations during the Cold War.[5]

Deutch fell out of favor with the Clinton administration because of public testimony he gave to Congress on Iraq. Specifically Deutch testified that Saddam Hussein was stronger than he was four years ago and the CIA might never be able to remedy the issue. Clinton replaced Deutch after he had won re-election.[6][7]

Deutch left the CIA on December 15, 1996,[2] and soon after it was revealed that several of his laptop computers contained classified information wrongfully labeled as unclassified.[8] In January 1997, the CIA began a formal security investigation of the matter. Senior management at CIA declined to fully pursue the security breach. Over two years after his departure, the matter was referred to the Department of Justice, where Attorney General Janet Reno declined prosecution. She did, however, recommend an investigation to determine whether Deutch should retain his security clearance.[9] Deutch had agreed to plead guilty to a misdemeanor for mishandling government secrets on Friday, January 19, 2001, but President Clinton pardoned him in his last day in office, two days before the Justice Department could file the case against him.[10][11]

Deutch’s CIA Clearance Suspended | WASHINGTON POST | AUG 21, 1999

CIA Director George J. Tenet announced yesterday that he has suspended the security clearance of his predecessor, John M. Deutch, for violating government rules by working with classified material on an unsecured computer at his home.

The unprecedented action against a widely respected and still powerful former official comes at a time of heightened concern over foreign espionage and the handling of classified information. It was clearly intended as a signal that the federal government, and the CIA in particular, is determined to tighten security.

Tenet said in a one-page statement that he decided to suspend Deutch’s clearance for an indefinite period “upon consideration of the nature of the security violations involved and Dr. Deutch’s responsibility, as leader of the Intelligence Community, to set the highest standards in the protection of classified information.”

IMPROPER HANDLING OF CLASSIFIED INFORMATION BY JOHN M. DEUTCH | CIA | FEB 18, 2000

  1. (U/ /FOUO) John M. Deutch held the position of Director of Central Intelligence (DCI) from May 10, 1995 until December 14, 1996. Several days after Deutch’s official departure as DCI, classified material was discovered on Deutch’s government-owned computer, located at his Bethesda, Maryland residence.

  2. (U/ /FOUO) The computer had been designated for unclassified use only and was connected to a modem. This computer had been used to access [an Internet Service Provider (ISP)], the Internet, [Deutch’s bank], and the Department of Defense (DoD). This report of investigation examines Deutch’s improper handling of classified information during his tenure as DCI and how CIA addressed this matter.

  3. (U/ /FOUO) Currently, Deutch is a professor at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He also has two, no-fee contracts with the CIA. The first is to provide consulting services to the current DCI and his senior managers; this contract went into effect on December 16, 1996, has been renewed twice, and will expire in December 1999. The second contract is for Deutch’s appointment to serve on the Commission to Assess the Organization of the Federal Government to Combat the Proliferation of Weapons of Mass Destruction (Proliferation Commission). Under the terms of the second contract, this appointment will continue until the termination of the Commission.