Computer Associates, Hertfordshire Constabulary And Metropolitan Police Service Create Web Site To Help Reunite Missing Children With Their Families | ICMEC | MAR 14, 2000

Web Site Designed and Hosted by CA to Assist UK Police Recover Missing and Exploited Children

ISLANDIA, N.Y. and DITTON PARK, UK – Computer Associates International, (CA), Hertfordshire Constabulary and the Metropolitan Police of London, today announced the launch of the UK Missing Children’s Web site (www.missingkids.co.uk), to help reunite missing children with their families.

CA Chairman and CEO Charles B. Wang said that helping Hertfordshire and the Metropolitan Police create the site is an important demonstration of how technology can benefit society.

“If CA developed all of this innovative technology and we didn’t apply it to meet the most basic needs of society, then we would have failed to meet our most fundamental human obligation,” said Wang. “We are happy to collaborate with police forces throughout the world to help return missing children to their rightful homes.”

The site enables police to place pictures of missing children on the Internet, along with details of when and where they were last seen, in the hope that members of the public will notice missing children and report their location to the authorities.

The Web site has been made possible through technology and consulting services donated by CA. The site’s origin, also sponsored by CA, stems from the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children (NCMEC) based in the United States. The site will link to similar sites worldwide as part of the newly established International Center for Missing and Exploited Children (ICMEC) network hosted by CA.

In addition, CA is providing police forces with the necessary computer equipment, including scanners and the NCMEC is providing the technical training on how to capture images and place them on the World Wide Web. CA has designed software to make this a swift ten-minute process.

All information on missing children, including updates, can be quickly and easily entered onto the site using a standard Web browser. Once critical data on a missing child is made available, the police can post it immediately for the rest of the world to see. Police can then print posters of missing children directly from the Web site and make them public minutes after the child is reported missing.

Searches can be conducted by name, location, sex, height, weight, age, hair color and other criteria. The system can quickly match general characteristics with individual children. Previously, there was no standard procedure for nationwide dissemination of electronic pictures of missing children.

“This Website gives police officers and the public the simplest and most effective tool needed when looking for a missing child—a picture,” said Chief Inspector Tim Bonnett, Hertfordshire Constabulary. “The Website will also show the Internet’s potential for many other policing purposes. This is an initiative that could have huge benefits, not just for missing children and their families, but for the development of police technology in spreading pictorial information.”

“The Metropolitan Police Service has helped to develop this Website which I believe will play an important part in helping to trace missing children. With the fast growth in Internet access and the expansion of the site to include all UK police forces I have no doubt that this will become an even more successful tool in the future,” said Ian Brown, detective superintendent, Metropolitan Police.

In an effort to enhance child recognition, innovative age-progression technology will be employed. This technology, integrated with the scanning of dated photographs of missing children can estimate a child’s physical appearance even years after a disappearance.

The Web site will use CA’s Ingres II database, Jasmine ii, the eBusiness platform, Unicenter TNG, CA enterprise management solution and CA’s advanced hosting services to supply an online, multilingual database of images and information. Built-in backup-and-recovery facilities help ensure that valuable data can be restored quickly in case of a momentary system failure. Unicenter TNG monitors server availability and usage patterns, further enhancing the responsiveness of the site.

The ability of Jasmine ii to dynamically generate Web pages provides an effective mechanism for keeping Web content current. Any change to the database is automatically posted to the Web site and immediately cascades through to the corresponding Web pages, keeping the site current at all times. Even non-technical personnel can be trained to perform web site management and administration.

The U.S. site, www.missingkids.com, receives nearly three million hits per day and is instrumental in the fight against child abduction and exploitation in the United States.

CA is actively working with the ICMEC to raise awareness about this problem and to help national and international law enforcement agencies solve missing children cases as quickly as possible.

This Web site adds to the numerous NCMEC support initiatives that Computer Associates has instituted. Late last year, the NCMEC dedicated its new headquarters building at 699 Prince Street in Alexandria, Virginia to Wang by naming it The Charles B. Wang International Children’s Building.

Computer Associates International, Inc. (NYSE: CA), the world’s leading business software company, delivers the end-to-end infrastructure to enable eBusiness through innovative technology, services and education. CA has 18,000 employees worldwide and had revenue of $6.3 billion for the year ended December 31, 1999. For more information, visit www.ca.com. As the nation’s resource center for child protection, the National Center for Missing & Exploited Children (NCMEC) spearheads national efforts to locate and recover missing children, and raises public awareness about ways to prevent child abduction, molestation and sexual exploitation. A private, nonprofit organization established in 1984, NCMEC operates under a congressional mandate and works in conjunction with the U.S. Department of Justice’s Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency. © 2001 Computer Associates International, Inc. One Computer Associates Plaza, Islandia, N.Y. 11749. All trademarks, trade names, service marks, and logos referenced herein belong to their respective companies.