Putting Contract Research Organisations on the Radar

It is a trend for pharmaceutical companies to contract third parties to conduct their clinical trials in order to test their drugs. This trend is referred to as ‘outsourcing’, and the companies that carry out the work are called ‘contract research organizations’ (CROs). In addition, clinical trials are increasingly conducted in non-traditional trial regions, which are mainly low- and middle-income countries. This trend is called ‘offshoring’. It is widely agreed that the offshoring of clinical trials to these regions should be scrutinized from an ethical perspective because of the vulnerability of the trial population. What happens when offshoring is combined with outsourcing? Do additional ethical risks arise when clinical trials are contracted out? Virtually all pharmaceutical companies publicly declare that they test their drugs in accordance with the highest ethical guidelines, such as the Declaration of Helsinki. But how do pharmaceutical companies safeguard their commitments when they outsource clinical trial activities to CROs in poor regions? These are the central questions that are addressed in this report.

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Briefng paper: Protection of Clinical Trial Participants in Countries Outside the EU

Medicines intended for the European market are increasingly tested on clinical trial participants outside the EU in low and middle income countries. Over the past years, SOMO and Wemos have collected extensive evidence of violations of ethical principles and guidelines in such trials. In this briefng paper, SOMO and Wemos provide the European Parliament, the European Commission and the European Medicines Agency (EMA) with policy recommendations to take their responsibility and address this problem.

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Clinton Gave China Chips for Nuclear War

The documents show that in 1996 Clinton approved the export of radiation hardened chip sets to China. The specialized chips are necessary for fighting a nuclear war. “Waivers may be granted upon a national interest determination,” states a Commerce Department document titled “U.S. Sanctions on China.”

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U.S. agrees to sell supercomputer to China, officials say Administration aims to embrace, not isolate, Beijing

WASHINGTON — In a good-will gesture toward China, the Clinton administration has agreed to sell it a sophisticated $8 million supercomputer, senior administration officials said yesterday. The decision is part of the administration’s strategy to embrace, rather than isolate, China despite disagreements over human rights, weapons proliferation and trade. The Clinton administration is determined to grab an ever-larger share of China’s market, the fastest growing in the world, and reduce a trade deficit that could exceed that with Japan by the end of the decade.

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Clinton Approves Technology Transfer to China

The Clinton Administration notified Congress today that it had approved the export of technology to China to permit the launching of a communications satellite aboard a Chinese rocket next month. President Clinton said in a letter to Congress that the transfer would not harm national security or significantly improve China’s military capability in space. The President was required under a 1998 law to certify that all such technology exports are in the national interest.

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Rutgers Received CIA Funds to Study Hungarian Refugees

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Rutgers Received CIA Funds to Study Hungarian Refugees
By John Jacobs September 1, 1977
The Central Intelligence Agency secretly funneled at least $5,000 to the sociology department at Rutgers University in the late 1950s to study Hungarian refugees who fled to this country after taking part in the 1956 Hungarian uprising. Documents the CIA released yesterday relating to its MK-ULTRA behavior-control program of the 1950s and 1960s and an interview with a Rutgers sociologist who took part in the research confirm the detail of the project.

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